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Decorating Library Reading Room or dorm room

Decorating Library Reading Room or dorm room

Going to college is a fun experience, moving into a dormitory room is an even enthralling one. Your living space and dorm room space should be an extension of who you are and not a clutter of books and discarded laundry. Most single dorm rooms are not that spacious to begin with and this presents a challenge in terms of knowing where and what to fit into your little home for the semester. To help you acclimatize better, we have come up with a few handy tips to help you make your home away from home feel serene and relaxed.

Optimizing the space you have

The major challenge to most college students is utilizing the space allocated feel bigger than it actually is as well as making it functional. Having floor to ceiling mirrors helps create the illusion of spaciousness. It is very important to have designated areas that serve specific purposes, for instance your study desk should not feel cluttered with such as mugs and cups but instead reserve that space for only the necessities. Having a small framed photo, a reading lamp and a pouch that holds all your stationary handy is. The temptation to leave laundry lying around is immense but this can prove to be a huge dilemma since continual build up leads to congestion. Folding and stowing away all your dirty laundry to a designated place helps reduce this problem and that is why having a designated laundry basket is important.

Personalizing your room

Making your dorm room feel more than just a rented room for the semester is about including elements that appeal to your personality as well as your general social life. Fancy chandeliers and artwork give your room a sense of elegance. Most dorm rooms do not allow the occupants to paint or renovate the rooms extensively so it is advisable to use frames that have sticky strips instead of ones that require drilling or nailing. Framed pictures of family and friends, brightly patterned curtains, and posters help eliminate the issue of blandness on the walls and window panes. Faux sheepskin rugs and fluffy carpets add an extra dimension to your floors as well as make it cozy for those days that you just want to lie on the floor. Bright colors like yellow, green and light blue will help give your dorm a sense of liveliness and free spiritedness. Make sure to use the decorations sparingly in order to not to over-saturate the walls. Having a particular color scheme in mind, for instance, rainbow colors, helps make the visuals look better patterned and organized.


Managing the essentials

Now that you have gotten your room to feel more lively and spacious, it is important not to forget the essential components of the dorm room which are your bed and closet. Make sure to have your bed spread and duvets match the general color scheme of the rest of your dorm room. Dark colors such as navy blue for bed sheets are an elected option to help conceal any glaring and accidental spills that may occur. Pillows’ primary purpose is to provide proper comfort so make sure to pick out ones that match your preferential needs without clashing with the room’s overall aesthetic.

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Let There Be Light

Let There Be Light

You always thought it would be nice to have an extra room in your house, but tearing down one of the outside walls just seems like too much of a hassle. The easy solution to your problem could be a conservatory or a sunroom. Or maybe you always wanted to have a room that would allow you to enjoy the serene beauty of snow falling all around you, while keeping you nicely warm and dry. A sunroom might be your answer. And it will add a room truly filled with natural light to your home.

 

There is nothing really new about conservatories or sunrooms, as they've been around ever since the 16th century.  Back then they were mostly used as gardens or greenhouses, which is why some people still refer to them as winter gardens. But in the more recent times, they are used as living rooms, home offices and many imaginative homeowners also use them for various other purposes.

 

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Say It With Flowers

Say It With Flowers

Every room has a feature that catches the eye first; it’s called the focal point. When a room’s design is drab, out-of-date, or over-cluttered, the default focal point might be something you don’t want to point out – the fraying edge of the rug, the gash in the paint from the day your friend leaned back too far in his chair, or the leg of the table that the cat has been using as a scratching post.

A multitude of design methods can rescue you from this situation. You might be able to keep a few favorite pieces in the room and start over with a bold new design that spruces it up from floor to ceiling. You might be able to repair and refinish what needs work and put a new coat of paint on the walls, rearranging a bit or adding some art work to create a better focal point in the room. Or, you might not have the budget to do any of that, but truly want the room to create a better impression for an upcoming party.

First, hide or minimize what problems you can. Do some deep cleaning, see if you can tack the fringe back onto the rug, and use a product like Restor-A-Finish that can help hide the scratches in the wood. If you have any of the wall paint left over, put a little bit of spackle in the gash, sand, and repaint. Don’t do either of those last two items on the morning of the event, because the odor will need time to dissipate.

Then, consider whether any rearrangement of the items in the room would help improve the flow and draw the eye to a more natural focal point. If the room is cluttered, that’s the first point to attack! Even if much of the stuff is decorative and interesting on its own, it will confuse the issue and prevent the room from conveying any unity of style. Remove it all, and then choose some of the best to put back in the room. Select locations where those items will create visual interest and draw the attention they deserve.

If the room is just drab and plain and you don’t have the budget for new art for the walls right now, consider adding just a few bold or eye-catching accessories to the room. This needn’t be a silver candelabra or anything else that’s hugely expensive. One of the best ways to spruce up a room quickly and create an attractive focal point is to keep the rest of the room simple but add a vase or bowl with a colorful display of fresh flowers.

If your walls and furnishings are neutral in color, the flower arrangement can be a variety of colors that look good together. If the room has any sort of color theme going, choose flowers that pick that up. Find a spot for display that isn’t hidden in a corner, but it doesn’t have to be right in the middle of the room, either. Step back for a moment and consider the effect. If it doesn’t yet provide enough interest to the room, consider nestling the vase or bowl in a bed of tulle in a shade that coordinates with the dominant flowers in the arrangement. Use simple and inexpensive design tricks such as these to bring a fresh aspect to a once tired room.

 

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Add a Dash of Autumn to Your Interior

Add a Dash of Autumn to Your Interior

Autumn is in the air. Mornings and evenings are getting chilly even if the occasional sunny day can still feel like summer. Pretty soon the leaves will start to get all those lovely colors and before you know it will get really cold. But let's not rush ahead. Autumn is the when all the vegetable patches are full of lovely produce and some of it might come in handy for a bit of decorating.
 

Pumpkins seem like the obvious choice when it comes to decoration. Most of the time we associate pumpkins with the jack-o'-lantern, but putting them in a basket on your table adds some lovely warm colors to your home and reminds you why so many cultures have associated autumn with various harvest festivals. It might even make your kids curious about the insides of the pumpkin. Possibly curious enough to make them eat some pumpkin soup.
 

Chilies come in some pretty interesting colors and shapes. Getting an assortment of chilies can make your dinner table look lovely, even if you don't like their aroma. When they start to look slightly withering you can also put them on a string and hang them in your kitchen to dry. It will give your kitchen aroma an instant dash of rustic charm. Drying chilies doesn't make a lot of sense if you are not about to use them, though. If you don't use them at home, you can pleasantly surprise someone who loves the chilies when the drying is done.
 

Let's not get stuck with vegetables though. There is a free alternative to getting vegetables. Just think of all the lovely colors you get from autumn leaves. After all would they write beautiful songs about autumn leaves if they weren't worth using for decorative purposes? When it comes to autumn leaves there are actually a number of ways to use them.
 

First of all, you could get some branches with leaves on them and put them in a vase. The natural effect you get from this looks lovely in room with few other colors. Eventually the leaves will turn brown, but using leaves that are already drying somehow makes you feel much more ecological as using freshly cut flowers.
 

If using branches seems a bit much, you can just go for some leaves. There are a number of ways to use them, but one of the simplest solutions is to get an autumn themed plate, put some leaves in it and add a candle or two. You get a lovely centerpiece all at once. You could add some acorns or walnuts to the leaves to make it seem even more autumnal. Be careful with those candles though. Burning them too low might put your lovely leaves on fire and put your home in danger.
 

If you are of the minimalist sort when it comes to decor, you could also just put a leaf or two underneath your usual decorative pieces to bring that hint of season into your home.

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Lighting the Way: Avoiding Over-Illumination in Interior Design

Lighting the Way: Avoiding Over-Illumination in Interior Design

When designing a room, lighting may be the single most important thing to consider. You may be emphasizing an accent wall with recessed halogen spots or choosing the best fixture to create the effect you want over the dining room table. Whatever you do, stop to think not only about the aesthetics of the fixture, but the amount and color of the light that will shine in the room.

Residential lighting, back in the day, was largely incandescent. Bulbs called “soft white” dominated the market and produced a fairly warm glow in a room. Of course, the bulbs actually were literally warm, not just warm in the perception of the occupant. Incandescent bulbs spend a comparatively large amount of energy to produce a small amount of light. In more recent years, as nations have adopted regulations that require a gradual phase-out of incandescent in favor of more efficient bulbs, home lighting has begun to change.

In this shift, many complaints once reserved for office lighting have moved into the home. Fluorescent lights, long used in offices and now a major player in the home market in the form of compact fluorescent bulbs (CFLs), produces more light with fewer watts of energy, but it may not be the quality of light you seek, and more is not always better. CFLs are now available that turn on without delay and that offer a warmer glow than the blue-toned light often found in office applications, but few are dimmable and all have the potential to release toxic mercury when they break. LED lights solve some of these problems, but are typically blue-pumped rather than the more familiar violet/ultraviolet, which can have unexpected effects on the appearance of white objects even while most colors are rendered well.

Why is more light not always better, even if requires less electricity to produce? Over-illumination, or the presence of more intense light than is needed for a specific activity, can have some serious and negative effects, including headaches, fatigue, stress and anxiety, and high blood pressure. So the insistence of many designers that every possible light be dimmable has some basis in science, and the idea of bringing home the stresses of work just by turning on the lights is a daunting prospect.

It turns out that LED manufacturers are thinking about this as well, and working to develop higher-performing dimmable LEDs. That this may be better achieved through LED fixtures than through LED lamps placed in standard fixtures based on incandescent bulbs will, no doubt, be of long-term economic interest to the home consumer. But a recent study published in the Journal of Consumer Psychology and reviewed in The Atlantic demonstrates that brighter lights intensify our emotional responses on both ends of the spectrum. For a calmer office or home, the scientists argue, dim the lights! And so, even as the world of home lighting shifts around us, it’s more important than ever for designers to consider lighting as they envision a project. Including natural light when possible and putting the homeowner in control of the level of light through an appropriate dimmable application should be at the forefront of our considerations at all times.

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